EDCI 500 02: Blog Reflection 7 Formative and Summative

April 28, 2013

Formative assessment is a helpful tool for teachers. Formative assessment is used before or during instruction to determine what students prior knowledge is, to determine if they are retaining information that is being given during instruction, identify areas of weakness and to determine if teaching methods are effective for the lesson.  Using formative assessments can help a teacher determine if the lesson plan or teaching methods need to be altered for a unit or if the lesson in place is an effective plan for the unit.

 

Summative assessment occurs at the end of instruction and can be used to determine what the student knows, the students level of accomplishment and whether the lesson plan in place is effective. Both formative and summative assessments are valuable tools for the classroom, while the assessments are testing different information they both provide valuable feed back for teachers. The information gained by using the assessments gives the teacher guidance on whether they need to come up with a better lesson plan and different approach for teaching the unit or if they can keep the lesson plan in place. It also identifies specific areas of weakness that the students are having so the teacher is able to review this information with them and expand upon the lesson.

 

As a future special education teacher I think that formative and summative tests are incredibly valuable to me. I think that formative assessments should be used at the being of every school year to establish where my students are. So much information is lost over the summer and some special education students have extreme difficulty with memory. It will help guide me on how much information we need to review, how far the students are ahead or behind other classes. It would also tell me if a student is further ahead of his or her classmates and could be used to help students who are struggling with information. I can also see the added benefit of using formative assessment throughout the school year to make sure that my teaching methods are working and students are progressing with the information.

Categories: Educational Psychology.

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EDCI 500 Blog Reflection 5: Teaching for Reflection

March 30, 2013

I have always felt that when I was able to put my hands on something and just work through the problem or see how something fits together I was able to walk away with more information and a better understanding of the concept of how and why something works. The teacher was able to hold my attention, because I knew that if I was good and paid attention that I would be able to explore and apply what I was learning.

 

I have loved all of the science classes that I have ever taken and I think that it was because I knew that eventually we would actually get to do something, there was always some experiment or exercise that we got to complete.

 

I feel that Ms. Baveja is building on students’ prior knowledge and using the tactile methods for her students. Inductive learning builds upon inference and evidence finding skills. Ms. Baveja is giving the students’ more and more difficult plants to identify and they have to build upon the information they have and categorizes plants into new categories and element the other ones previously identified. By doing this she is teaching the students’ about concepts. Woolfolk defines concepts as “defining attributes, or distinctive features” (Woolfolk, 2013, 299). The students’ gain the knowledge of the identifying the plants based upon prediction by examining one part of the plant you can predict what the other part of the plant is going to be like. For example, if you look at the leaves of a plant, can you tell if the plant has a deep root base or a shallow root base?

 

The students from Ms. Baveja’s group also were able to identify plants because they had actual memories of seeing and identifying plants; this is referred to as exemplars. Exemplars are something that people do naturally according to Woolfolk (2013).

 

For myself I think that I would prefer teaching in a more tactile method for the inductive learners. More special education students are visual or tactile learners. Teaching the inductive process is more beneficial I feel for more students.

Hoy, A. W. (2013). Educational psychology. Boston: Pearson.

Miller, K. (Producer). (2010). Inductive Learning [Motion picture on Internet].

Categories: Educational Psychology.

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